What is heart disease in simple terms?

Heart disease: Any disorder that affects the heart. Sometimes the term “heart disease” is used narrowly and incorrectly as a synonym for coronary artery disease. Heart disease is synonymous with cardiac disease but not with cardiovascular disease which is any disease of the heart or blood vessels.

What causes heart diseases?

About half of all Americans (47%) have at least 1 of 3 key risk factors for heart disease: high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and smoking. Some risk factors for heart disease cannot be controlled, such as your age or family history. But you can take steps to lower your risk by changing the factors you can control.

What does heart disease do?

They don’t usually cause pain, but without regular blood flow, your body doesn’t get the oxygen it needs. That may lead to bluish skin, shortness of breath, and feeling tired. Defects often make your heart work harder, which can cause heart failure — when your heart’s too weak to pump blood the way it should.

What parts of the body are affected by heart disease?

Heart disease describes conditions that affect a person’s heart muscle, heart valves, coronary arteries, or heart rhythm. Each of these components plays an important part in a person’s overall heart health.

What are the two major categories of heart disease?

In this Article

  • Coronary Artery Disease (CAD)
  • Heart Arrhythmias.
  • Heart Failure.
  • Heart Valve Disease.
  • Pericardial Disease.
  • Cardiomyopathy (Heart Muscle Disease)
  • Congenital Heart Disease.

Who is at risk of heart disease?

Men age 45 or older and women age 55 or older are more likely to have a heart attack than are younger men and women. Tobacco. This includes smoking and long-term exposure to secondhand smoke. High blood pressure.

How can we prevent heart disease?

There are several ways you can reduce your risk of developing coronary heart disease (CHD), such as lowering your blood pressure and cholesterol levels.

  • Eat a healthy, balanced diet.
  • Be more physically active.
  • Keep to a healthy weight.
  • Give up smoking.
  • Reduce your alcohol consumption.
  • Keep your blood pressure under control.

Who does heart disease affect?

Heart disease is the leading cause of death for men, women, and people of most racial and ethnic groups in the United States. One person dies every 36 seconds in the United States from cardiovascular disease.

How does heart disease affect quality of life?

Patients with history of CVD may experience various physical and emotional symptoms such as fatigue, edema, and sleeping difficulties that limit their physical and social activities which will in turn result in poor quality of life.

What happens if heart disease is left untreated?

What happens if heart disease is left untreated? If heart disease is not treated, it can cause severe angina, heart failure with shortness of breath on even mild activities. The risk of death is increased. Most physicians are now very familiar with treating heart disease, so it does not often go untreated.

How do you test for heart disease?

There are many noninvasive tests available to help your doctor check for heart disease.

  • Electrocardiogram. An electrocardiogram (EKG) is a short test that monitors the electrical activity in your heart.
  • Echocardiogram.
  • Stress test.
  • Carotid ultrasound.
  • Holter monitor.
  • Chest X-ray.
  • Tilt table test.
  • CT scan.

What are the 4 uncontrollable risk factors?

The “uncontrollable” risk factors are:

  • Age (the risk increases with age)
  • Gender (men develop CAD 10 years earlier than women)
  • Family history (genetic predisposition and common lifestyles increase risk)
  • Race (incidence is greater in some groups of African Americans, Hispanics, Asian Americans, native American Indians,)

What is the best diet to prevent heart disease?

The best diet for preventing heart disease is one that is full of fruits and vegetables, whole grains, nuts, fish, poultry, and vegetable oils; includes alcohol in moderation, if at all; and goes easy on red and processed meats, refined carbohydrates, foods and beverages with added sugar, sodium, and foods with trans

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